On… changing jobs

Shortly after I got married, I also changed jobs. Just to make things more stressful.

Well, not quite. My actual job is the same as before, and it wasn’t my idea

What happened was that the company I’d been working for over the past 17 years (Steria, formerly Xansa, who I joined when they were called the FI Group) was asked to transfer all the people working for Barclaycard over to Barclays. Most of my colleagues had been TUPE’d over from Barclays ten years before, so for them it was going back. It’s not a culture shock for me, as I’ve been working at Barclaycard for over four years anyway, but it’s strange to have a new set of bosses.

I never had intended to work for one company for so long – I think of the 60 people who joined the Graduate scheme at FI when I did, only 1 still works for them now. All through the nineties I kept hearing that the ‘job for life’ was history, and I had always wanted to get varied experience anyway. But as FI/Xansa/Steria supply other companies, I did get to work at a few places and do different things. There was programming at first, then all kinds of data analysis for Y2K (a very real problem in big and old systems such as in the bank we were at), then application support with overnight on call, followed by doing specifications and design and more recently Business Analysis.

I am not really sad to leave Steria. It is not the company I joined in 1995 (name changes and mergers notwithstanding). It was largely a private company back then (although they floated 1996), and dominated by female management. This was pretty unusual for an IT company – and still is – but was a legacy of the origins of FI Group, being set up by Stephanie ‘Steve’ Shirley in the 60s primarily to allow women with dependants to get work in the nascent IT industry. They were doing homeworking before it was even a buzzword. It was also regarded as very employee friendly, listed as one of the top companies to work for and much of the shares were owned by workers.

Despite not being a ‘dotcom’ or really working in the web industry back then, they were hit by the 2001 tech bubble crashing. Over time the company has become more like its competitors, more male, more invested in offshoring, more interested in the bottom line. They were never great fans of unions (so I joined one), but towards the end seemed to be even less ready to co-operate

Barclays/Barclaycard of course have their issues in the recent past, with the ‘casino capitalism’ under Bob Diamond and others, LIBOR rate manipulation and mis-selling of PPI.

About these ads

One Response to “On… changing jobs”

  1. flanglewangle Says:

    “How to move jobs without moving jobs”. You should write a book.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 203 other followers

%d bloggers like this: